Art Dubai Returns for Its 13th Edition With A Fresh New-Look


 

We’ve made significant changes to the design and layout of the fair – it will feel different the moment you step through the door. We’ve also worked hard to secure a fantastic gallery line up, many of whom will be bringing new artworks not shown before. Combined with new gallery section, Bawwaba; open studios from UAE-based artistic collectives as part of UAE Now; performance art and an after-dark music, we’re positive Art Dubai 2019 will be upbeat and dynamic with lots to appeal to our loyal fair-goers and those that may never have visited before,” said Chloe Vaitsou, International Director of Art Dubai.

Team Amanqi takes a look at some of the most exciting emerging female Arab artists whose highly-collectable work will be shown at the fair (March 20-23).

 


 

Photo :Courtesy of Jens Martin

Photo :Courtesy of Jens Martin

Dana Awartani represented by ATHR (Jeddah)

 

Dana Awartani (b 1987) practice is firmly rooted in traditional Islamic art forms and techniques – intricate manuscript illumination, parquetry, ceramics, stained glass, miniature painting, and mosaics – yet are continual acts of revival, performances of contemporisation. Her commitment to preserving historical techniques of traditional art is evident in her work, as well as the outreach projects throughout schools and communities she contributes to in order to further the appreciation of the traditional arts.

 

Art Dubai

Photo: Courtesy of Art Dubai

Daniah Al Saleh, winner of Ithra Art Prize 2019

 

Saudi-born London-based Daniah Al Saleh (b 1970), recently announced as the winner of the second edition of the Ithra Art Prize 2019 will have her winning work, Sawtam, exhibited at Art Dubai, before being moved to Ithra as part of its permanent collection. Sawtam is a digital, audio-visual presentation consisting of 28 screens, arranged in a 4×7 grid. Each screen is dedicated to a separate sound or phoneme, representing a letter of the Arabic alphabet and the installation is programmed to play the sounds at random, meaning that when a viewer stands in front of the work, they are enveloped within a wall of sound that is meaningless but comprised of the parts of verbal language that are used every day.

My practice, in general, is based on things that are hidden in plain sight. I am interested in the things that we use every day but are unobtrusive. One of those things is speech or the act of talking. We do it all the time without thinking about the act itself. I decided to ask the question: if I deconstructed speech, what am I left with? The smallest entity of speech is the phoneme. Phoneme are the units from which we create language as well as the thoughts we want to express,” said Al Saleh.

 

Art Dubai

Photo: Courtesy of Art Dubai

Farah Al Qasimi represented by The Third Line (Dubai)

 

The Third Line gallery is known for nurturing young early-career artists and this Art Dubai brings early-career Emirati artist Farah Al Qasimi (b.1991). Al Qasimi’s recent work investigates the role of two-dimensionality in surveillance as it relates to portraiture and the photographic medium and has her first solo show at Jameel Arts Centre opening this month. She’s firmly on our ones-to-watch list.

 

Art Dubai

Photo: Courtesy of Art Dubai

Shaikha Al Mazrou represented by Lawrie Shabibi 

 

Following on from Emirati artist Shaikha Al Mazrou (b 1988)’s sell-out show, ‘Expansion/Extension’, at Lawrie Shabbibi last year, the gallery will exhibit new works which are heavily tipped to propel her further onto the international stage. Al Mazrou’s practice is anchored in history of art, borrowing formally from minimalism and intellectually from conceptual art. Often in her work she combines mass-produced materials such as electronic waste or construction materials with color and form, experimenting with these resources to create abstract geometric arrangements.

 


 

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